Gradle can be integrated with many different third-party tools such as IDEs and continuous integration platforms. Here we look at some of the more common ones as well as how to integrate your own tool with Gradle.

IDEs

Android Studio

As a variant of IntelliJ IDEA, Android Studio has built-in support for importing and building Gradle projects. You can also use the IDEA Plugin for Gradle to fine-tune the import process if that’s necessary.

This IDE also has an extensive user guide to help you get the most out of the IDE and Gradle.

Eclipse

If you want to work on a project within Eclipse that has a Gradle build, you should use the Eclipse Buildship plugin. This will allow you to import and run Gradle builds. If you need to fine tune the import process so that the project loads correctly, you can use the Eclipse Plugins for Gradle. See the associated release announcement for details on what fine tuning you can do.

IntelliJ IDEA

IDEA has built-in support for importing Gradle projects. If you need to fine tune the import process so that the project loads correctly, you can use the IDEA Plugin for Gradle.

NetBeans

Add the Gradle Support plugin to NetBeans in order to import and run projects with Gradle builds.

Visual Studio

Gradle comes with a Visual Studio plugin that will generate VisualStudioProject and VisualStudioSolution files for your native projects.

Continuous integration

We have dedicated guides showing you how to integrate a Gradle project with the following CI platforms:

Even if you don’t use one of the above, you can almost certainly configure your CI platform to use the Gradle Wrapper scripts.

How to integrate with Gradle

There are two main ways to integrate a tool with Gradle:

  • The Gradle build uses the tool

  • The tool executes the Gradle build

The former case is typically implemented as a Gradle plugin. The latter can be accomplished by embedding Gradle through the Tooling API.